Register on your own according to nationality

The number of authorities to register with depends on your nationality. You can get all your registrations done at the International Citizen Service (ICS). 


Nordic citizens

Step 1: Citizen Service

At Citizen Service (Borgerservice) you register your address and obtain your Civil Registration Number (CPR number). You can register at either the local Citizen Service in your municipality or the International Citizen Service (ICS)

Step 2: Tax registration

Before you start working in Denmark, you should register at the Danish Customs and Tax Administration (Skattestyrelsen). They will issue an electronic tax card, which Aarhus University needs to calculate your taxes.  

If you do not have an electronic tax card, your employer must withhold 55 per cent of your salary. Your tax card will be sent directly to your employer.

Read more about how to apply for a personal tax number and a tax card

No tax registration if on the tax scheme for foreign researchers and highly paid employees

If you are on the tax scheme for foreign researchers and highly paid employees (paying a gross income tax of 27 %) you should not register with the Danish Customs and Tax Administration. Aarhus University will take care of the registration for you. 

What to bring to get registered

There are a number of documents you must submit in order to successfully register with the public authorities. The required forms, documents and certificates depend on your nationality.

See the page about documents to bring to get registered

EU/EEA-citizens

Step 1: Danish Agency for International Recruitment and Integration (SIRI)

Once you arrive in Denmark, you need to apply for an EU residence document with the Danish Agency for International Recruitment and Integration (SIRI). You may initiate the process 1-2 weeks before you start your work in Denmark. Your application will normally be processed immediately (0-30 days). 

You must book a time in advance before visiting SIRI. For further information about SIRI branch offices, see the New to Denmark website.

Step 2: Citizen Service

At Citizen Service (Borgerservice) you register your address and obtain your Civil Registration Number (CPR number). You can register at either the local Citizen Service (Borgerservice) in your municipality or the International Citizen Service (ICS)

As an EU/EEA/Swiss citizen you can register with Citizen Service if you stay in Denmark for more than three months. However, you are only required to register if you plan to stay in Denmark for longer than six months. If you choose not to register, we strongly encourage you to hold a European Health Insurance Card (EHIC or “Blue Card”) from your home country.

Once you are registered with Citizen Service, you are issued with a Civil Registration Number (CPR number). About 14 days after you have been registered, you will receive a yellow health insurance card by post, which carries your Danish Civil Registration Number (CPR number).

Step 3: Tax registration

Before you start working in Denmark, you should register at the Danish Customs and Tax Administration (Skattestyrelsen). They will issue an electronic tax card, which Aarhus University needs to calculate your taxes.    

If you do not have an electronic tax card, your employer must withhold 55 per cent of your salary. Your tax card will be sent directly to your employer.

Read more about how to apply for a personal tax number and a tax card

No tax registration if on the tax scheme for foreign researchers and highly paid employees

If you are on the tax scheme for foreign researchers and highly paid employees (paying a gross income tax of 27 %) you should not register with the Danish Customs and Tax Administration. Aarhus University will take care of the registration for you. 

What to bring to get registered

There are a number of documents you must submit in order to successfully register with the public authorities. The required forms, documents and certificates depend on your nationality.

See the page about documents to bring to get registered

Non-EU/EEA-citizens

Step 1: Biometric features

Once you arrive in Denmark you need to have your biometric features recorded if you have not already done so in your home country. You must do this within a specified time (usually 14 days) after arriving in Denmark.

You can visit one of the SIRI branch offices around the country. You need to book a timeslot beforehand. Find further information and link to booking   

Step 2: Citizen Service 

At Citizen Service (Borgerservice) you register your address and obtain your Civil Registration Number (CPR number).

As non-EU/EEA/Swiss citizen you must register with Citizen Service if you stay in Denmark for more than three months. You can register at either the local Citizen Service (Borgerservice) in your municipality or the International Citizen Service (ICS)

Once you are registered with Citizen Service, you are issued with a Civil Registration Number (CPR number). About 14 days after you have been registered, you will receive a yellow health insurance card by post, which carries your Danish Civil Registration Number (CPR number).

Step 3: Tax registration

Before you start working in Denmark, you should register at the Danish Customs and Tax Administration (Skattestyrelsen). They will issue an electronic tax card, which Aarhus University needs to calculate your taxes.  

If you do not have an electronic tax card, your employer must withhold 55 per cent of your salary. Your tax card will be sent directly to your employer.

Read more about how to apply for a personal tax number and a tax card

No tax registration if on the tax scheme for foreign researchers and highly paid employees

If you are on the tax scheme for foreign researchers and highly paid employees (paying a gross income tax of 27 %) you should not register with the Danish Customs and Tax Administration. Aarhus University will take care of the registration for you. 

What to bring to get registered

There are a number of documents you must submit in order to successfully register with the public authorities. The required forms, documents and certificates depend on your nationality.

See the page about documents to bring to get registered